Streamlining environmental reviews and permitting for infrastructure projects is a major objective of President Trump. And one of the biggest permitting roadblocks that can come up in renewable energy, transmission line, resource recovery, and any other infrastructure projects is potential impacts to wildlife. Continue Reading Infrastructure Permitting Tug of War Between Trump Administration and Citizen Groups

On April 3, 2018, the Illinois Commerce Commission (ICC) approved, with a number of substantial modifications, the Illinois Power Agency’s (IPA) first “long term renewable resources procurement plan” under the Illinois Future Energy Jobs Act (Illinois Public Act 99-0906, known as FEJA) enacted in December 2016. The ICC order resolves a number of issues regarding (i) long-term forward procurements of renewable energy credits (RECs) from new utility-scale renewable generation facilities, and (ii) the new Illinois Adjustable Block Program (ABP), Community Solar Generation (CSG) Program, and Illinois Solar for All Program (ISFA) mandated by FEJA. Continue Reading Illinois Commerce Commission Modifies and Approves the Illinois Power Agency’s First Long-Term Renewable Resources Procurement Plan

With the inauguration of President Trump as the 45th President of the United States, stakeholders in various sectors of the energy industry have speculated about the future of energy policy in the new administration. While the early days of the administration have seen a clear commitment to the oil and gas sectors with action on the Dakota Access and Keystone XL pipelines, the question remains regarding the president’s anticipated support of the renewable energy sector. Continue Reading Renewable Energy Development Can Still Look to PURPA as New Administration Moves In

In 2013, President Obama issued the Climate Action Plan. Its goal: to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from a broad range of economic sectors. Moreover, the Climate Action Plan is the key set of initiatives necessary to achieve the United  States’ GHG reduction commitment set out in the 2015 Paris Agreement, an international accord.

We covered the initiation of a wide range of rulemakings in a blog post dated September 28, 2015, and, as the Obama Administration comes to a close, climate change rulemakings continue to move forward. The most contentious rule—the Clean Power Plan—has moved from rulemaking to litigation. Many other rules (e.g. new rules limiting methane emissions from the oil and gas industry and the renewable fuel standards) have moved from proposal to final rules. We summarize the status of 10 different rules, standards, or programs meant to implement the Climate Action Plan below. Continue Reading Recap: Climate Action Plan Nears Completion

A slowly developing renewable fuels market, several well-publicized fraud cases, and EPA’s delayed volumetric designations that frustrated industry participants have led EPA and the CFTC to a new era of cooperation. On March 17, 2016, the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced that they would share Renewable Fuel Standard data and analysis pursuant to a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU). Under the MOU, the CFTC and EPA can share information and conduct joint or separate investigations into potential fraud, market abuse, deceptive practices, commodity market manipulation, or other violations relating to the generation of, and trading in, Renewable Identification Numbers (RINs). Continue Reading CFTC and EPA sign Memorandum of Understanding on Renewable Fuel Markets

On February 9, 2016, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a 5-4 decision staying implementation of the Clean Power Plan until the D.C. Circuit rules on challenges to the Plan. The Court left open the possibility that it would review the D.C. Circuit’s ultimate decision.

The decision delays President Obama’s Climate Action Plan. The Clean Power Plan is its key climate change rule. It requires states and utilities to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by generating less electricity from coal, and more from lower carbon-emitting sources like natural gas, or zero-carbon sources like solar and wind. The Plan has an ambitious goal: to reduce CO2 emissions 32% below 2005 levels by 2030. Continue Reading Supreme Court Stays Clean Power Plan

The D.C. Circuit denied industry petitioners’ motions to stay the effectiveness of the Clean Power Plan on Jan. 21. In a two-page order, the court found the petitioners had not satisfied the requirements for a stay pending review and issued an expedited case schedule.

The order asked parties to submit a format for briefing as well as a schedule by Jan. 27, 2016 that ensures that all briefing will be complete by April 22, 2016. Parties will debate whether the cost of implementing the rule is too great and whether EPA has exceeded the bounds of its authority, among numerous other issues. Oral arguments are scheduled to begin June 2, 2016 and continue to June 3 if necessary. This schedule could allow for a court decision before initial state plans are due in September 2016. Continue Reading Clean Power Plan Will Stay in Effect Pending the Outcome of Litigation

On November 19, 2015 the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) issued a proposal titled “Reactive Power Requirements for Non-Synchronous Generation.” In this proposal, the Commission proposes to revise standard generator interconnection agreements (GIAs) to eliminate the exemptions for non-synchronous generation, including wind generators, from the requirement to provide reactive power. Continue Reading FERC Issues Proposal to Require Wind Generators to Provide Reactive Power

The summer of 2015 saw several controversial EPA rulemaking proceedings that will affect the energy, transportation, waste management and construction sectors across the United States.  These rulemakings implement President Obama’s 2013 Climate Action Plan, which has a goal of  reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to mitigate the impacts of climate change. Continue Reading Climate Action Plan Takes Shape

On May 29, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed long-delayed Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) volume requirements for 2014, 2015, and 2016. Despite significant efforts to promote the use of renewable fuels, real-world limitations, such as the slower than expected development of the cellulosic biofuel industry, less growth in gasoline use than was expected when Congress enacted these provisions in 2007, and constraints in supplying certain biofuels to consumers, have made Congress’ original RFS goals for 2014, 2015, and 2016 effectively beyond reach.  Congress established the RFS program in 2005 (42 U.S.C. § 15801) and expanded the program in 2007 (EISA, P.L. 110-140), when it set specific volume production goals.  The program, according to EPA, is designed to promote energy security by increasing the percentage of domestic renewable fuels used in transportation. The RFS program has played a key role in the emergence of the biofuels industry but has been insufficient to overcome challenges such as the declining demand for gasoline, insufficient infrastructure capacity to transport the fuels, high cost associated with producing some renewable fuels, and limitations on how much renewable fuel can be blended with conventional fuels. As production of renewable fuels lagged, EPA failed to use its discretion to waive the Congressionally-authorized goals. Continue Reading EPA Announces Long-Awaited Renewable Volume Obligations