On April 27, the Biden administration announced new proposed infrastructure initiatives that may enable developers to finally break ground on their “shovel-ready” transmission line projects, including over $8 billion in financing tools from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the administration’s effort to develop low-carbon energy. On the same day, the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) also issued new guidance on how federal and state agencies can work together to approve developers looking to use the land running alongside highways, known as the federal highway right-of-way (ROW), for construction of power transmission, clean-energy, and connectivity projects.
Continue Reading Biden Administration Infrastructure Plan Could Jumpstart “Shovel-Ready” High-Voltage Transmission Line Projects

Regulated companies need to understand what material courts can consider when they review administrative decisions. The Administrative Procedure Act generally allows courts to consider only the existing administrative record when reviewing agency decision-making to determine whether agency decisions are arbitrary and capricious. But the Supreme Court recently reminded us that this rule is not absolute by looking beyond the record in Dep’t of Commerce v. New York to block an agency decision that it found to be based on a “contrived,” pretextual rationale.

Regulated companies may be able to ask courts to consider information beyond the administrative record if they can show that the agency acted in bad faith or exhibited improper behavior. A company’s ability to present the court with information beyond a record carefully constructed by an agency can be a powerful tool.
Continue Reading Going Beyond: When Can Courts Look Past the Record in an APA Review?