Pruitt Declares “The War Against Coal is Over”

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt declared “the war against coal is over” yesterday in his announcement that the EPA will move to repeal the Clean Power Plan. In a lengthy proposal leaked last week that was then updated and signed October 10, the EPA proposes to repeal the Clean Power Plan (CPP), a controversial regulation designed to cut carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from existing fossil fuel-fired power plants. In support of the proposal, the EPA describes the Obama-era EPA’s interpretation of the Clean Air Act as unlawful. Continue Reading

Utilities Empowered to Help Shape How Coal Ash is Regulated

In response to utility industry requests, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued interim final guidance earlier this month that sets forth a process for state submission and criteria for approval of state-led Coal Combustion Residual (CCR) permit programs under the Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation Act. Continue Reading

Four Milestones Since the Birth of a Significantly Revised TSCA

Following the one year anniversary of significant amendments to the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA), there has been a flurry of activity related to the Act—from new rules issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to lawsuits filed across the country. Here are some of the major highlights:

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Next Steps in EPA Deferral to States: Waters of the U.S. Rule Repeal and Replacement

Consistent with President Trump’s February 28, 2017 Executive Order, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) announced a joint proposal representing the first step of a two-part plan to implement a more narrow “waters of the U.S.” or “WOTUS” definition. The first step, published in the Federal Register on July 27, 2017, seeks to repeal the 2015 WOTUS rule, and replace prior rules. Continue Reading

No Delay for Proposition 65 Listing of Glyphosate

For the past several months, Monsanto has been in court challenging California’s decision to add the chemical glyphosate—the active ingredient in its herbicide Roundup—to the Proposition 65 list. It recently faced a setback when the California Supreme Court rejected Monsanto’s request to stay a lower court’s decision to include glyphosate among the 960 chemicals on the list.  California’s Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) wasted no time after the decision and added glyphosate to the list on July 7, 2017. Continue Reading

EPA Jobs Review Mandate Win May Have Sweeping Industry Impact

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit recently overturned a lower court’s order for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to conduct a study of air pollution rules’ impact on jobs, and it has broad ramifications across industries.

The Fourth Circuit’s ruling in Murray Energy Corp. v. Adm’r EPA may impact the scope of citizen suits under the Clean Air Act (CAA) and other statutes, including environmental activism cases with the potential to expose companies to significant liabilities. In addition, the EPA’s future rulemaking is likely to continue to have significant implications for industry jobs. Continue Reading

Methane Rule Litigation Creates Uncertainty for Oil and Gas Companies

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia recently denied the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) proposed delay of an Obama-era rule that limits methane emissions from new oil and gas equipment, sending oil and gas companies scrambling to immediately ensure compliance with the rule to avoid any enforcement actions. Continue Reading

TSCA Framework Rules Offer Manufacturers Regulatory Clarity

On the one year anniversary of major amendments to the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued three new “framework” rules on how it plans to prioritize and evaluate risks from new chemicals or new uses of chemicals — offering clearer guidance to manufacturers on how chemicals will be evaluated and regulated. Continue Reading

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